Eurasian Journal of Soil Science

Volume 3, Issue 3, Nov 2014, Pages 172 - 181
DOI: 10.18393/ejss.86540
Stable URL: http://ejss.fess.org/10.18393/ejss.86540
Copyright © 2014 The authors and Federation of Eurasian Soil Science Societies



Role of mineral matrix composition and properties in the transformation of corn residues

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Pinskiy,D., Maltseva,A., Zolotareva,B., 2014. Role of mineral matrix composition and properties in the transformation of corn residues. Eurasian J Soil Sci 3(3):172 - 181. DOI : 10.18393/ejss.86540
Pinskiy,D.,Maltseva,A.,& Zolotareva,B. Role of mineral matrix composition and properties in the transformation of corn residues Eurasian Journal of Soil Science, DOI : 10.18393/ejss.86540
Pinskiy,D.,Maltseva,A., and ,Zolotareva,B."Role of mineral matrix composition and properties in the transformation of corn residues" Eurasian Journal of Soil Science, DOI : 10.18393/ejss.86540
Pinskiy,D.,Maltseva,A., and ,Zolotareva,B. "Role of mineral matrix composition and properties in the transformation of corn residues" Eurasian Journal of Soil Science, DOI : 10.18393/ejss.86540
D,Pinskiy.A,Maltseva.B,Zolotareva "Role of mineral matrix composition and properties in the transformation of corn residues" Eurasian J. Soil Sci, vol., no., pp., DOI : 10.18393/ejss.86540
Pinskiy,David ;Maltseva,Anastasiya ;Zolotareva,Berta Role of mineral matrix composition and properties in the transformation of corn residues. Eurasian Journal of Soil Science,. DOI : 10.18393/ejss.86540

How to cite

Pinskiy, D., Maltseva, A., Zolotareva, B., 2014. Role of mineral matrix composition and properties in the transformation of corn residues. Eurasian J. Soil Sci. 3(3): 172 - 181. DOI : 10.18393/ejss.86540

Author information

David Pinskiy , Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Sciences, Pushchino, Russia
Anastasiya Maltseva , Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Sciences, Pushchino, Russia
Berta Zolotareva , Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Sciences, Pushchino, Russia

Publication information

Issue published online: 05 Nov 2014
Article first published online : 25 Oct 2014
Manuscript Accepted : 14 Oct 2014
Manuscript Received: 15 May 2014
DOI: 10.18393/ejss.86540
Stable URL: http://ejss.fesss.org/10.18393/ejss.86540

Abstract

The influence of the composition and properties of the mineral matrix in soils on the humification of corn residues was studied. The substrate (silica sand, loam, silica sand + 10% bentonite, or silica sand + 30% kaolinite) was mixed with 10% corn residues (milled to 3–5 mm) and incubated under stationary conditions for 6–19 months. Sampling for the analysis was performed every month, and a few times in the first month. The dynamics of mineralization and humification of plant residues was studied by applying elemental and bulk analyses of neogenic organic matter (OM), densitometric fractionation of substrates, FTIR spectroscopy, solid-phase 13C-NMR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with an electron microprobe. It was shown that the humification processes had a wavelike character for loam and sand substrates, which could be explained by the transformation of the microorganism populations together with the change in the amount and quality of OM in the system. The main mechanism for the stabilization of neogenic OM was adsorption on a mineral matrix with formation of relatively resistant compounds. This adsorption can be selective, depending on the composition and properties of the mineral matrix. The FTIR and 13C-NMR analyses of OM distribution in different substrates and densitometric fractions showed that sand and heavy fractions (HF >2.2 g/cm3) were enriched with compounds of an aromatic nature and polypeptides. Light fractions (LF-2, 1.4–2.2 g/cm3) accumulated compounds that also contained alkyl and carboxyl groups. The sandy substrate and HF have higher aromaticity indices than LF-2. Higher aromaticity index values of humus substances in the sandy substrate and HF in the loamy substrate, compared to LF-2, evidenced the formation of steady aromatic compounds, in which there may be kernels of humic acids (HA). We do not exclude the possibility of the matrix synthesis of the HA-like substances.

Keywords

Humification, humic substances, mineral substrate, densitometric fractionation

Corresponding author

References

Aleksandrova, L.N. 1980. Soil Organic Matter and the Processes of Its Transformation. Nauka, Leningrad. 288 p. [in Russian].

Aleksandrova, L.H., 1970. Humus forming processes in soil. In: Suvorov V.V. (Ed.), Soil Humus Substances. Zap. Leningr. Sel’skokhoz. Inst. V. 142, pp. 26–82.

Bambalov, N.N., Khoruzhik, A.V., Yankovskaya, N.S., 1990. Regularities and specific features of humification in peat soils. In: Efimov V.N. (Ed.), Organic Matter of Soils and Methods of Its Study. LSKhI, Leningrad, pp. 29–33 [in Russian].

Birkel, U., Gerold, G., Niemeyer, J., 2002. Abiotic reactions of organics on clay mineral surfaces. Developments in Soil Science 28: 437–447.

Chenu, C., Plante, A.F., 2006. Clay sized organomineral complexes in a cultivation chronosequence: revisiting the concept of the “primary organo–mineral complex. European Journal of Soil Science 57: 596–607.

Dick, D.P., Santos, J.H.Z., Ferranti, E.M., 2003. Chemical characterization and infrared spectroscopy of soil organic matter from two southern Brazilian soils. Brazilian Journal of Soil Science 27: 29–39.

Flaig, W., 1971. Organic compounds in soil. Soil Science 111 (1): 19–33.

Kaiser, K., Guggenberger, G., Haumaier, L., Zech, W., 1997. Dissolved organic matter sorption on subsoils and minerals studied by 13C NMR and DRIFT spectroscopy. European Journal of Soil Science 48: 301–310.

Kaiser, K., Guggenberger, G., 2003. Mineral surfaces and soil organic matter. European Journal of Soil Science 54 (2): 219–236.

Kholodov, V.A., Konstantinov, A.I., Perminova, I.V., 2009. The carbon distribution among the functional groups of humic acids isolated by sequential alkaline extraction from gray forest soil. Eurasian Soil Science 42 (11). 1229–1233.

Kononova, M.M., 1963. Soil Organic Matter. Izd. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Moscow, 314 p [in Russian].

Kurochkina, G.N., Pinskii, D.L., 2003. Kinetics and thermodynamics of polyelectrolyte adsorption on synthetic aluminosilicate gels. Eurasian Soil Science 36 (2): 155–163.

Kurochkina, G.N., Pinskii, D.L., 2004. The formation of mineral–organic compounds and their effect on the surface properties of soil aluminosilicates. Eurasian Soil Science 37 (4): 378–387.

Lehmann, J., Kinyangi, J., Solomon, D., 2007. Organic matter stabilization in soil microaggregates: implications from spatial heterogeneity of organic carbon contents and carbon forms. Biogeochemistry 85. 45–57.

Lyuzhin, M.F., 1968. Mineralization and humification of plant residues in soil. Zap. Leningr. Sel’skokhoz. Inst. 117 (1). 27–39.

Magid, J., Gorissen, A., Giller, K.E., 1996. In search of the elusive "active” fraction of soil organic matter: three size–density fractionation methods for tracing the fate of homogeneously 14C–labelled plant material. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 28: 89–99.

Mikutta, R., Kleber, M., Torn, M.S., Jahn, R., 2006. Stabilization of soil organic matter: association with minerals or chemical recalcitrance? Biogeochemistry 77: 25–56.

Orlov, D.S., 1990. Humic Acids of Soils and a General Theory of Humification. Mosk. Gos. Univ., Moscow, 325 p. [in Russian].

Orlov, D.S., Osipova, N.N., 1988. Infrared Spectra of Soils and Soil Components. Mosk. Gos. Univ., Moscow, 89 p. [in Russian].

Pinskii, D.L., 1997. Ion–Exchange Processes in Soils. Sokolova, T.A. (Ed.). ONTI, Pushchino, 167 p [in Russian].

Pinskii, D.L., Kurochkina, G.N., 2006. Evolution of theories on soil adsorption capacity. In: Kudeyarov V.N. (Ed.), Soil Processes and Spatio Temporal Organization of Soils (Nauka, Moscow,), pp. 295–312 [in Russian].

Schnitzer, M., 1977. Soil organic matter. Proc. 3rd Intern. Symp. Vienna. Intern. At. En. Agency, pp. 117–132.

Semenov, A.M., Semenov, V.M., van Bruggen, A., 2011. Diagnosis of the health and quality of soils. Agrokhimiya 12: 4–20.

Sollins, P., Swanston, C., Kleber, M., Filley, T., Kramer, M., Crow, S., Caldwell, B.A., Lajtha, K., Bowden, R., 2006. Organic C and N stabilization in a forest soil: evidence from sequential density fractionation. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 38: 3313–3324.

Sollins, P., Kramer, M.G., Swanston, C., Lajtha, K., Filley, T., Aufdenkampe, A.K., Wagai, R., Bowden, R.D., 2009. Sequential density fractionation across soils of contrasting mineralogy: evidence for both microbial– and mineral–controlled soil organic matter stabilization. Biogeochemistry 96 (1–3): 209–231.

Travnikova, L.S., 2002. Patterns of humus accumulation: new data and their interpretation. Eurasian Soil Science 35 (7): 737–748.

Turchenek, L.W., Oades, J.M., 1979. Fractionation of organo–mineral complexes by sedimentation and density techniques. Geoderma 21: 311–343.

Van Lutzow, M., Kogel–Knabner, I., Ekschmitt, K., Matzner, E., Guggenberger, G., Marschner, B., Flessa, H., 2006. Stabilization of organic matter in temperate soils: mechanisms and their relevance under different soil conditions¬ – a review. European Journal of Soil Science 57 (4): 426–445.

Vanyushina, A.Ya., Travnikova, L.S., 2003. Organic Mineral Interactions in Soils: A Review. Eurasian Soil Science 36 (4): 379–387.

Zavarzina, A.G., 2006. A mineral support and biotic catalyst are essential in the formation of highly polymeric soil humic substances. Eurasian Soil Science 39 (Suppl. 1): 48–53.

Abstract

The influence of the composition and properties of the mineral matrix in soils on the humification of corn residues was studied. The substrate (silica sand, loam, silica sand + 10% bentonite, or silica sand + 30% kaolinite) was mixed with 10% corn residues (milled to 3–5 mm) and incubated under stationary conditions for 6–19 months. Sampling for the analysis was performed every month, and a few times in the first month. The dynamics of mineralization and humification of plant residues was studied by applying elemental and bulk analyses of neogenic organic matter (OM), densitometric fractionation of substrates, FTIR spectroscopy, solid-phase 13C-NMR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with an electron microprobe. It was shown that the humification processes had a wavelike character for loam and sand substrates, which could be explained by the transformation of the microorganism populations together with the change in the amount and quality of OM in the system. The main mechanism for the stabilization of neogenic OM was adsorption on a mineral matrix with formation of relatively resistant compounds. This adsorption can be selective, depending on the composition and properties of the mineral matrix. The FTIR and 13C-NMR analyses of OM distribution in different substrates and densitometric fractions showed that sand and heavy fractions (HF >2.2 g/cm3) were enriched with compounds of an aromatic nature and polypeptides. Light fractions (LF-2, 1.4–2.2 g/cm3) accumulated compounds that also contained alkyl and carboxyl groups. The sandy substrate and HF have higher aromaticity indices than LF-2. Higher aromaticity index values of humus substances in the sandy substrate and HF in the loamy substrate, compared to LF-2, evidenced the formation of steady aromatic compounds, in which there may be kernels of humic acids (HA). We do not exclude the possibility of the matrix synthesis of the HA-like substances.

Keywords: Humification, humic substances, mineral substrate, densitometric fractionation

References

Aleksandrova, L.N. 1980. Soil Organic Matter and the Processes of Its Transformation. Nauka, Leningrad. 288 p. [in Russian].

Aleksandrova, L.H., 1970. Humus forming processes in soil. In: Suvorov V.V. (Ed.), Soil Humus Substances. Zap. Leningr. Sel’skokhoz. Inst. V. 142, pp. 26–82.

Bambalov, N.N., Khoruzhik, A.V., Yankovskaya, N.S., 1990. Regularities and specific features of humification in peat soils. In: Efimov V.N. (Ed.), Organic Matter of Soils and Methods of Its Study. LSKhI, Leningrad, pp. 29–33 [in Russian].

Birkel, U., Gerold, G., Niemeyer, J., 2002. Abiotic reactions of organics on clay mineral surfaces. Developments in Soil Science 28: 437–447.

Chenu, C., Plante, A.F., 2006. Clay sized organomineral complexes in a cultivation chronosequence: revisiting the concept of the “primary organo–mineral complex. European Journal of Soil Science 57: 596–607.

Dick, D.P., Santos, J.H.Z., Ferranti, E.M., 2003. Chemical characterization and infrared spectroscopy of soil organic matter from two southern Brazilian soils. Brazilian Journal of Soil Science 27: 29–39.

Flaig, W., 1971. Organic compounds in soil. Soil Science 111 (1): 19–33.

Kaiser, K., Guggenberger, G., Haumaier, L., Zech, W., 1997. Dissolved organic matter sorption on subsoils and minerals studied by 13C NMR and DRIFT spectroscopy. European Journal of Soil Science 48: 301–310.

Kaiser, K., Guggenberger, G., 2003. Mineral surfaces and soil organic matter. European Journal of Soil Science 54 (2): 219–236.

Kholodov, V.A., Konstantinov, A.I., Perminova, I.V., 2009. The carbon distribution among the functional groups of humic acids isolated by sequential alkaline extraction from gray forest soil. Eurasian Soil Science 42 (11). 1229–1233.

Kononova, M.M., 1963. Soil Organic Matter. Izd. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Moscow, 314 p [in Russian].

Kurochkina, G.N., Pinskii, D.L., 2003. Kinetics and thermodynamics of polyelectrolyte adsorption on synthetic aluminosilicate gels. Eurasian Soil Science 36 (2): 155–163.

Kurochkina, G.N., Pinskii, D.L., 2004. The formation of mineral–organic compounds and their effect on the surface properties of soil aluminosilicates. Eurasian Soil Science 37 (4): 378–387.

Lehmann, J., Kinyangi, J., Solomon, D., 2007. Organic matter stabilization in soil microaggregates: implications from spatial heterogeneity of organic carbon contents and carbon forms. Biogeochemistry 85. 45–57.

Lyuzhin, M.F., 1968. Mineralization and humification of plant residues in soil. Zap. Leningr. Sel’skokhoz. Inst. 117 (1). 27–39.

Magid, J., Gorissen, A., Giller, K.E., 1996. In search of the elusive "active” fraction of soil organic matter: three size–density fractionation methods for tracing the fate of homogeneously 14C–labelled plant material. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 28: 89–99.

Mikutta, R., Kleber, M., Torn, M.S., Jahn, R., 2006. Stabilization of soil organic matter: association with minerals or chemical recalcitrance? Biogeochemistry 77: 25–56.

Orlov, D.S., 1990. Humic Acids of Soils and a General Theory of Humification. Mosk. Gos. Univ., Moscow, 325 p. [in Russian].

Orlov, D.S., Osipova, N.N., 1988. Infrared Spectra of Soils and Soil Components. Mosk. Gos. Univ., Moscow, 89 p. [in Russian].

Pinskii, D.L., 1997. Ion–Exchange Processes in Soils. Sokolova, T.A. (Ed.). ONTI, Pushchino, 167 p [in Russian].

Pinskii, D.L., Kurochkina, G.N., 2006. Evolution of theories on soil adsorption capacity. In: Kudeyarov V.N. (Ed.), Soil Processes and Spatio Temporal Organization of Soils (Nauka, Moscow,), pp. 295–312 [in Russian].

Schnitzer, M., 1977. Soil organic matter. Proc. 3rd Intern. Symp. Vienna. Intern. At. En. Agency, pp. 117–132.

Semenov, A.M., Semenov, V.M., van Bruggen, A., 2011. Diagnosis of the health and quality of soils. Agrokhimiya 12: 4–20.

Sollins, P., Swanston, C., Kleber, M., Filley, T., Kramer, M., Crow, S., Caldwell, B.A., Lajtha, K., Bowden, R., 2006. Organic C and N stabilization in a forest soil: evidence from sequential density fractionation. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 38: 3313–3324.

Sollins, P., Kramer, M.G., Swanston, C., Lajtha, K., Filley, T., Aufdenkampe, A.K., Wagai, R., Bowden, R.D., 2009. Sequential density fractionation across soils of contrasting mineralogy: evidence for both microbial– and mineral–controlled soil organic matter stabilization. Biogeochemistry 96 (1–3): 209–231.

Travnikova, L.S., 2002. Patterns of humus accumulation: new data and their interpretation. Eurasian Soil Science 35 (7): 737–748.

Turchenek, L.W., Oades, J.M., 1979. Fractionation of organo–mineral complexes by sedimentation and density techniques. Geoderma 21: 311–343.

Van Lutzow, M., Kogel–Knabner, I., Ekschmitt, K., Matzner, E., Guggenberger, G., Marschner, B., Flessa, H., 2006. Stabilization of organic matter in temperate soils: mechanisms and their relevance under different soil conditions¬ – a review. European Journal of Soil Science 57 (4): 426–445.

Vanyushina, A.Ya., Travnikova, L.S., 2003. Organic Mineral Interactions in Soils: A Review. Eurasian Soil Science 36 (4): 379–387.

Zavarzina, A.G., 2006. A mineral support and biotic catalyst are essential in the formation of highly polymeric soil humic substances. Eurasian Soil Science 39 (Suppl. 1): 48–53.



Eurasian Journal of Soil Science